Month: June 2021

WASHINGTON — The FDA should be doing more to stop kids from getting addicted to e-cigarettes, House members told FDA Acting Commissioner Janet Woodcock, MD, at a hearing on youth vaping on Wednesday. “I just want to make sure America understands, you have the authority to commit today to preventing millions of kids from becoming
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It’s all fun and games (and barbecues and boating) until your allergies kick in and put a pause on your Fourth of July celebrations. Whether you struggle with food or environmental allergies, there are steps you can take to help steer clear of reactions this holiday weekend. Avoid environmental triggers In early July, grass and
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From answering ‘awkward’ questions to encouraging curiosity and kindness, we explore how to approach conversations with children There are 14 million disabled people in the UK, yet talking about disability is still seen as a taboo topic. It can feel awkward for everyone involved, but it doesn’t have to be that way. As a disabled
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A key molecular mechanism underpinning the anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, and neuroprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids has been identified.   In findings that could lead to the development of new treatments for depression, the research provides the “first evidence” that hippocampal neurons are able to produce two key lipid metabolites of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic
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Scientists have developed a near infrared technology to non-invasively detect common pregnancy complications. The rate of overall pregnancy and childbirth complications in adult women in the US rose between 2014 and 2018 (1). This rise may be explained by the increase in women with pre-existing conditions before pregnancy and advanced maternal age (6). The most
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3D rendering of blood cancer Cancer Research UK is collaborating with Aleta Biotherapeutics (Aleta) to trial a new therapy that ‘reboots’ a treatment for some people with blood cancer whose cancer starts to come back. The new therapy, called ALETA-001, aims to boost a treatment called CAR T-cell therapy, which takes some of a patient’s
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. It is safe for patients with migraine to receive any of the COVID-19 vaccines without concern about the vaccination interfering with their migraine medications or the medications reducing an immune response to the vaccine, according to a presentation at the American
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NEWTON, MA –June 10, 2021 – Acer Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: ACER), a pharmaceutical company focused on the acquisition, development and commercialization of therapies for serious rare and life-threatening diseases with significant unmet medical needs, today announced that following a recent Type B meeting with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding Acer’s proposed Edsivo™
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In a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, investigators developed and validated a genetic risk score for predicting the onset and severity of the most common type of scoliosis in adolescents–called adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). AIS causes spinal deformities in as many as 3% of youth, and because its heritability is
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Like many primary care practices, after a hasty transition to a year of phone calls and video visits, my practice is slowly transitioning back to “normal,” meaning that we are now seeing more patients in person than by video. However, as I reflect on the past year, I wonder how central this notion of the
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Award-winning nutritionist, author, speaker and founder of Happy Hormones for Life Nicki Williams shares her thoughts on our ‘Feisty Four’ hormones Nicki Williams has significant professional experience as a nutritionist but it was her personal experiences around 10 years ago that lay the foundations for her business Happy Hormones for Life. Like so many women
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Patients with schizophrenia and parkinsonism show distinctive patterns of cortical surface markers compared with their counterparts without parkinsonism and with healthy controls, results of a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study suggest. Dr Robert Christian Wolf Sensorimotor abnormalities are common in schizophrenia patients, however, “the neurobiological mechanisms underlying parkinsonism in [schizophrenia], which in treated samples represents
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Polyhydroxy acids, also known as PHAs, are a type of ingredient that is sometimes used in skincare.  What are PHAs in skincare, how do they work, and what are their potential benefits and side effects? What are PHAs in skincare? PHAs are small molecules with a specific structure and acidic pH, and they are a
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A workplace showdown may be brewing over mandating vaccinations. Employers would love the sense of certainty that comes with a vaccinated workforce. Workers can be brought back sooner than later, there’s no need for physical distancing in the office and there will be less worry about employees falling ill from COVID-19. And polls suggest many
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Clinicians more often use a strict age cutoff for stopping colon cancer screening than they do for stopping breast and prostate cancer screening, new data suggest. Whether to continue screening and how to make that decision are “not necessarily consistent between clinicians or…cancer types,” study author Justine P. Enns, a researcher at Johns Hopkins University,
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According to researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Rice University in Houston, silicone breast implants with a smoother surface design have less risk of producing inflammation and other immune system reactions than those with more roughly textured coatings. Results of the experiments using mice, rabbits and samples of human
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