Children

Northwestern Medicine scientists developed a unique nanoparticle to deliver genome editing technology, including CRISPR/Cas9, to endothelial cells, which line blood vessel walls. Published in Cell Reports, this is the first time that vascular endothelial cells could be reached for genome editing, since the usual way to deliver CRISPR/Cas9 – through a virus – does not
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Infants born via uncomplicated cesarean delivery, without labor or membrane rupture before delivery and no concern for infection, should not need antibiotics at birth, according to a study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, which were published today in Pediatrics, could help clinicians tailor the use of early antibiotics in newborns.
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In a recent study published on the medRxiv* preprint server, a team of researchers tested the durability of antibodies produced by a vaccine-induced full-length severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein and receptor-binding domain (RBD). They also analyzed the antibody levels targeting the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant of concern (VOC), in younger adolescent children.
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Metabolic differences could explain why some metastatic breast cancer cells rapidly generate tumors after migrating from primary tumors to the brain, while others linger for months or years before forming these secondary tumors, UT Southwestern scientists report in a new study. The findings, published in Cell Metabolism, highlight metabolic vulnerabilities in malignant cells that could
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The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is undergoing repeated and extensive mutational changes that have led to the emergence of several variants of concern (VOC) that often show higher transmissibility and immune-evasion characteristics. Among these VOCs include the Delta variant, which played a major role in the most recent wave of infections, hospitalizations,
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Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received three grants totaling more than $6.8 million to advance research on a novel imaging system to monitor uterine contractions. The electromyometrial imaging system, called EMMI, was invented and developed at Washington University. The device allows physicians to measure, in 3D, the electrical activity
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At least 2% of the total global population have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‑CoV‑2) at some point during the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and more than 200 million infants were born since the onset of the pandemic. Millions of in-utero exposures to maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection are therefore likely.
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A new UCSF study that mapped the neural connections of newborns with two different kinds of brain injuries found the maps looked very different-;and were linked to significantly different developmental outcomes years later. The study, published today in PLOS ONE and led by UCSF pediatrics, neurology and radiology researchers, used diffusion MRI to visualize the
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Online learning poses additional challenges to children with chronic medical conditions or special education needs, and these patients could benefit from more support from pediatric clinicians to be academically successful, according to a new opinion piece in JAMA Pediatrics released today and co-written by researchers at Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine. Clinicians should
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In a recent study published on the medRxiv* preprint server, researchers used data from the real-time assessment of community transmission-1 (REACT-1) study to analyze the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) community prevalence, the effect of age and region on the infection, vaccine efficacy in children, booster vaccine effectiveness in adults, and the emergence
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Researchers in Japan have evaluated hemodynamic factors that may help identify sites where aneurysms are likely to form. Detailed findings of this study are described in the article “Computational fluid dynamic analysis of the initiation of cerebral aneurysms” by Soichiro Fujimura et al., published today in the Journal of Neurosurgery. Unruptured aneurysms are most often
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Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found marked decreases in orphanhood particularly double orphanhood, among adolescents in Rakai, Uganda, corresponding with the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) beginning in 2004 and of male medical circumcision in 2007. Until now, little had been known about the contribution of HIV combination prevention including ART
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Children and staff who repeatedly test negative for COVID-19 after contact with someone who has the illness can safely remain in school if universal masking programs are in place, according to a new “test-to-stay” study report from the ABC Science Collaborative. The finding provides a safe alternative to quarantining people who have been exposed to
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The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has resulted in approximately 5.42 million deaths and over 286 million confirmed cases. The first instances of COVID-19 were reported in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, in December 2019, with the majority of those affected having worked in a seafood and animal
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The concept of gamification is increasingly gaining popularity-;tourists frequently traveling overseas earn frequent flier points from their preferred airline; customers purchasing apparel from their favorite fashion outlet accumulate customer loyalty points. Both of these examples involve gamification: the inclusion of game-like features (points) to increase the odds of a desired outcome (a future purchase). Although
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A new study from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found children’s books may perpetuate gender stereotypes. Such information in early education books could play an integral role in solidifying gendered perceptions in young children. The results are available in the December issue of the journal Psychological Science. “Some of the stereotypes
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HSE academics joined researchers from the Turner Scientific Research Institute for Children’s Orthopaedics to study how the brains of children with arthrogryposis control elbow flexion after muscle transplantation. They found that in such patients, more motor neuron activity occurs, which means that the start of a new movement requires more effort from the brain. The
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A team led by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine, Scripps Research and the University of Chicago has identified an important site of vulnerability on influenza viruses—a site that future influenza vaccines and antibody therapies should be able to target to prevent or treat infections by a broad set of influenza strains. The scientists, whose results
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A new study suggests that a parenting educational intervention for first-born children is robust enough to influence the weight of second-born children, according to a paper published online in Obesity, The Obesity Society’s flagship journal. The findings presented make the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) program the first educational intervention for
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